Vascular Plants of the Gila Wilderness

Presented in Association with the
Western New Mexico University Department of Natural Sciences

Datura stramonium Linnaeus
(Jimsonweed)


Family: Solanaceae

Synonyms:
Datura tatula Linnaeus

Datura stramonium looks similar to both D. wrightii and D. quercifolia, the other members of the genus found regularly in the Gila National Forest and surrounding areas. However, the capsules and seeds can be used to easily separate the three species. The capsules of D. wrightii hang downward (are dependent), while those of D. stramonium and D. quercifolia are erect. In addition, the seeds of D. wrightii are brown with three thickened cords of tissue around the rim. The capsule of D. quercifolia bears stout spines that are over a centimeter long. The capsule of D. stramonium bears spines that are greater in number than those of D. quercifolia and much shorter and less stout. The seeds of D. stramonium are kidney shaped, blackish and roughened. D. stramonium is not as common as the other species of Datura, but can be found in sandy areas at lower to middle elevation in this area.
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Datura stramonium, photo Russ Kleinman & Karen Blisard, Grant County, Pinos Altos, October 25, 2017



Datura stramonium, habit, photo Russ Kleinman & Karen Blisard, Grant County, Pinos Altos, October 25, 2017



Datura stramonium, dehiscing capsule, photo Russ Kleinman & Karen Blisard, Grant County, Pinos Altos, October 25, 2017



Datura stramonium, dehiscing capsule with seeds visible, photo Russ Kleinman & Karen Blisard, Grant County, Pinos Altos, October 25, 2017



Datura stramonium, closeup of leaf, photo Russ Kleinman & Karen Blisard, Grant County, Pinos Altos, October 25, 2017



Datura stramonium, photomicrograph of seeds, photo Russ Kleinman & Karen Blisard, Grant County, Pinos Altos, October 25, 2017



Datura stramonium, photomicrograph of single seed, photo Russ Kleinman & Karen Blisard, Grant County, Pinos Altos, October 25, 2017


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